Monday, March 6, 2017

New paper out - 

Predominance and Metabolic Potential of Halanaerobium in Produced Water from Hydraulically Fractured Marcellus Shale Wells


Microbial activity in the produced water from hydraulically fractured oil and gas wells may potentially interfere with hydrocarbon production and cause damage to the well and surface infrastructure via corrosion, sulfide release, and fouling. In this study, we surveyed the microbial abundance and community structure of produced water sampled from 42 Marcellus Shale wells in southwestern Pennsylvania (well age ranged from 150 to 1846 days) to better understand the microbial diversity of produced water. We sequenced the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene to assess taxonomy and utilized qPCR to evaluate the microbial abundance across all 42 produced water samples. Bacteria of the order Halanaerobiales were found to be the most abundant organisms in the majority of the produced water samples, emphasizing their previously suggested role in hydraulic fracturing related microbial activity. Statistical analyses identified correlations between well age and biocide formulation and the microbial community, in particular the relative abundance of Halanaerobiales. We further investigated the role of the order Halanaerobiales in produced water by reconstructing and annotating a Halanaerobium draft genome (named MDAL1), using shotgun metagenomic sequencing and metagenomic binning. The recovered draft genome was found to be closely related to the species H. congolense, an oil-field isolate, and Halanaerobium sp. T82-1, also recovered from hydraulic fracturing produced water. Reconstruction of metabolic pathways revealed Halanaerobium sp. MDAL1 to have the potential for acid production, thiosulfate reduction, and biofilm formation, suggesting it have the capability to contribute to corrosion, souring, and biofouling events in the hydraulic fracturing infrastructure.

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